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Myth Busted

July 10th, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Myth Busted: Sweating More Doesn’t Necessarily Mean You Burned More Calories

Many people wrongly believe that how much you sweat indicates how effective your workout was. How much you sweat during a workout is due to a variety of factors such as weight, gender, age, genetics, temperature and even fitness level.

For example, men tend to sweat more than women, younger people tend to sweat more than older people and fit people tend to sweat more than those who are less fit.

So remember, don’t use sweat as an indicator for how intense your workout was. Instead, track your heart rate, level of muscle soreness and amount of progress seen to evaluate whether or not your workouts are effective.

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Strawberries Named Dirtiest Produce

June 1st, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Strawberries Named Dirtiest Produce for 3rd Year in a Row by EWG

Every year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) releases a Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce report that details which fruits and veggies are the least—and most—contaminated by pesticides. The guide is designed to help you make healthy and informed choices and reduce your exposure to toxic pesticides.

For the third year in a row, strawberries top the “Dirty Dozen” list of the most pesticide-tainted produce, with one-third of all conventional strawberry samples containing 10 or more pesticides. One sample even contained 22 pesticide residues.

The other fruits and vegetables on the Dirty Dozen list are:

SpinachNectarines
ApplesGrapes
PeachesCherries
PearsTomatoes
CeleryPotatoes
Sweet bell peppers

While pesticides boost crop yields, multiple studies have linked pesticides in produce to conditions like asthma, cancer, fertility issues and brain conditions. The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station recommends rinsing produce under water for 30 seconds to get rid of pesticide residues. For more information, visit EWG’s website.

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CDC Recommends Shingles Vaccine

May 3rd, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Despite CDC Recommendation, Many Adults Still Refusing Shingles Vaccine

Shingles is an extremely common—and painful—viral infection, affecting 1 out of every 3 Americans at some point in their life. It’s caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox, so anyone who has had chickenpox is at risk of developing shingles. After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus remains dormant in the body. While scientists are unsure what causes the virus to awaken at a later date, they do know that the only way to reduce the risk of getting shingles is to get vaccinated. 

Recommended Shingles Vaccine

The CDC recommends that adults use a new vaccine called Shingrix instead of Zostavax, which had been the recommended vaccine from 2006-2017. Shingrix provides strong protection against shingles and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the most common shingles complication. In studies, two doses of Shingrix were found to be more than 90 percent effective at preventing shingles and PHN.

Who Should Get Vaccinated?

The CDC recommends that healthy adults 50 years and older get two doses of Shingrix, two to six months apart. People who have had shingles in the past, have received the Zostavax vaccine or are unsure if they have had chickenpox should also receive the Shingrix vaccine, according to CDC recommendations.

To find doctor’s offices or pharmacies near you that offer the vaccine, visit HealthMap Vaccine Finder.

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Signs of a Kidney Stone

April 5th, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

A recent study published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings journal found that the prevalence of kidney stones has increased more than fourfold in women and more than twofold in men over the past 30 years.

If treated in a timely fashion, kidney stones usually don’t cause permanent damage. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience any of the following:

  • Pain so severe that you can’t sit still or find a comfortable position
     
  • Pain accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fever or chills
     
  • Blood in your urine
     
  • Difficulty passing urine
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Eating Healthy ? Expensive

March 2nd, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

 

Eating Healthy Doesn’t Have to Be Expensive

 

Eating a well-balanced diet is a key component in living a long, healthy life. Many Americans think that eating healthy means they have to empty their wallets, which isn’t necessarily the truth. Keep the following money-saving tips in mind next time you’re grocery shopping:

  1. Make a weekly meal plan. Before you go to the store, think about what meals and snacks you want for the week. Read recipes thoroughly so you can make an accurate list of everything you need, reducing the risk that you’ll have to run back to the store later in the week.
     
  2. Create a list—and stick to it. Make a detailed list of what you need to buy before you go to the store. When you get to the store, don’t buy anything besides what’s on the list.
     
  3. Plan where you’re going to shop. Many grocery stores run sales or offer coupons on various healthy foods. Check out the ads and plan your grocery list around what’s on sale.
     
  4. Shop seasonally. Fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season are usually easier to get and may be a lot less expensive. Click here for a list of what’s in season.
     
  5. Cook at home as often as possible. Many foods prepared at home are cheaper and more nutritious. Go back to the basics and find a few simple and healthy recipes that your family enjoys.
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Conditions That Can Cause Cancer

February 2nd, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

2 Chronic Conditions That Can Cause Cancer

New research suggests that nearly 6 percent of cancers (792,600 cancer cases) can be at least partly attributed to obesity and diabetes. The study, which was published online on The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology website, states that diabetes and a high body mass index (greater than 25) are both associated with a higher risk of certain cancers and are increasing in prevalence.

Fortunately, Type 2 diabetes and obesity can be prevented with proper lifestyle changes, which include the following:

  • Avoiding tobacco
  • Exercising regularly
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Eating a healthy diet and limiting your intake of unhealthy foods
  • Managing your stress
  • Regularly checking your cholesterol and blood pressure
  • Visiting your doctor for routine preventive care

Implementing the above prevention tips can help you remain healthy and avoid developing chronic conditions like obesity and Type 2 diabetes, which, in turn, can help lower your risk of certain cancers. For more information, please review the full-text version of the study.

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Winter Sports Safety Tips

January 4th, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

The cold, crisp air and breathtaking views are just a few of the simple joys associated with winter sports. To ensure that your skiing or snowboarding excursions remain safe, be sure to keep in mind the following five tips:

  1. Inspect your skiing or snowboarding equipment to ensure that it is in good working condition.
     
  2. Wear protective headgear, such as a helmet and snow goggles.
     
  3. Yield to skiers or snowboarders in front of or below you on the slope.
     
  4. Carry a fully charged cellphone with you at all times.
     
  5. Never drink alcohol while skiing or snowboarding.
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Stress-free Holiday Season

November 9th, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Start Planning Today for a Stress-free Holiday Season


While the holiday season brings joy and togetherness, it can also bring stress for many individuals and families. Top holiday stressors include staying on a budget, managing multiple commitments and finding the perfect gift. Fortunately, by getting organized and planning out what you can ahead of time, you can help reduce your holiday stress.

  • Write down any known commitments. Does your child’s school have a holiday concert? Are you planning on hosting a holiday dinner? Making a list of your commitments will help you plan your time and help you avoid double-booking yourself.
     
  • Create your budget now. If you’re stressed about how your holiday spending will impact you after the holidays are over, you’re not alone. Remember, the sentiment of a gift is much more important than the cost. Set a realistic budget and do not go over it.
     
  • Start shopping early. Do you already know what you want to get some people on your list? Don’t be afraid to shop early. Sometimes, you can get great deals on presents even before the holiday season hits. Moreover, you can avoid the scenario of not being able to get the gift you want because it’s sold out.

Though these tips won’t prevent all of the holiday stress you may experience, they can definitely can help reduce it. If you experience high holiday stress, try these coping mechanisms to get your stress under control.

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10 Easy Halloween Safety Tips

October 3rd, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Halloween should be an exciting time of year for children and their parents, but too often the celebration devolves into tragedy. This season, make safety the top priority for your family.

Best Practices for Parents

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has compiled a list of Halloween best practices. Follow these tips to keep your family safe.

  1. Always accompany young children when trick-or-treating.
  2. Watch for motorists and cross alleys carefully.
  3. Only visit houses that are well-lit when trick-or-treating.
  4. Use reflective tape or other light-up devices to increase your child’s nighttime visibility, especially when wearing dark costumes.
  5. Do not let children eat strangers’ homemade treats.
  6. Avoid candles and open flames, especially when in costume.
  7. Keep costume accessories soft and flexible (for example, swords or knives).
  8. Examine your children’s treats for choking hazards or tampering before they eat.
  9. Remove any costume makeup before bed to avoid skin and eye irritation.
  10. Make sure costumes and accessories do not impair visibility or inhibit movement.
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