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Conditions That Can Cause Cancer

February 2nd, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

2 Chronic Conditions That Can Cause Cancer

New research suggests that nearly 6 percent of cancers (792,600 cancer cases) can be at least partly attributed to obesity and diabetes. The study, which was published online on The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology website, states that diabetes and a high body mass index (greater than 25) are both associated with a higher risk of certain cancers and are increasing in prevalence.

Fortunately, Type 2 diabetes and obesity can be prevented with proper lifestyle changes, which include the following:

  • Avoiding tobacco
  • Exercising regularly
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Eating a healthy diet and limiting your intake of unhealthy foods
  • Managing your stress
  • Regularly checking your cholesterol and blood pressure
  • Visiting your doctor for routine preventive care

Implementing the above prevention tips can help you remain healthy and avoid developing chronic conditions like obesity and Type 2 diabetes, which, in turn, can help lower your risk of certain cancers. For more information, please review the full-text version of the study.

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Winter Sports Safety Tips

January 4th, 2018 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

The cold, crisp air and breathtaking views are just a few of the simple joys associated with winter sports. To ensure that your skiing or snowboarding excursions remain safe, be sure to keep in mind the following five tips:

  1. Inspect your skiing or snowboarding equipment to ensure that it is in good working condition.
     
  2. Wear protective headgear, such as a helmet and snow goggles.
     
  3. Yield to skiers or snowboarders in front of or below you on the slope.
     
  4. Carry a fully charged cellphone with you at all times.
     
  5. Never drink alcohol while skiing or snowboarding.
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Stress-free Holiday Season

November 9th, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Start Planning Today for a Stress-free Holiday Season


While the holiday season brings joy and togetherness, it can also bring stress for many individuals and families. Top holiday stressors include staying on a budget, managing multiple commitments and finding the perfect gift. Fortunately, by getting organized and planning out what you can ahead of time, you can help reduce your holiday stress.

  • Write down any known commitments. Does your child’s school have a holiday concert? Are you planning on hosting a holiday dinner? Making a list of your commitments will help you plan your time and help you avoid double-booking yourself.
     
  • Create your budget now. If you’re stressed about how your holiday spending will impact you after the holidays are over, you’re not alone. Remember, the sentiment of a gift is much more important than the cost. Set a realistic budget and do not go over it.
     
  • Start shopping early. Do you already know what you want to get some people on your list? Don’t be afraid to shop early. Sometimes, you can get great deals on presents even before the holiday season hits. Moreover, you can avoid the scenario of not being able to get the gift you want because it’s sold out.

Though these tips won’t prevent all of the holiday stress you may experience, they can definitely can help reduce it. If you experience high holiday stress, try these coping mechanisms to get your stress under control.

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10 Easy Halloween Safety Tips

October 3rd, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Halloween should be an exciting time of year for children and their parents, but too often the celebration devolves into tragedy. This season, make safety the top priority for your family.

Best Practices for Parents

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has compiled a list of Halloween best practices. Follow these tips to keep your family safe.

  1. Always accompany young children when trick-or-treating.
  2. Watch for motorists and cross alleys carefully.
  3. Only visit houses that are well-lit when trick-or-treating.
  4. Use reflective tape or other light-up devices to increase your child’s nighttime visibility, especially when wearing dark costumes.
  5. Do not let children eat strangers’ homemade treats.
  6. Avoid candles and open flames, especially when in costume.
  7. Keep costume accessories soft and flexible (for example, swords or knives).
  8. Examine your children’s treats for choking hazards or tampering before they eat.
  9. Remove any costume makeup before bed to avoid skin and eye irritation.
  10. Make sure costumes and accessories do not impair visibility or inhibit movement.
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National Preparedness Month

September 7th, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Since 2004, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the national Ready Campaign have promoted National Preparedness Month (NPM) every September. NPM encourages Americans to take steps to prepare for all types of emergencies and strives to increase the overall number of people, families and communities that engage in preparedness actions.

The most recent data from the Red Cross, though, reveals that despite 8 out of 10 Americans feeling unprepared for a catastrophic event, only 1 in 10 has taken the following appropriate preparedness steps:

  • Create a family emergency plan.
  • Stock an emergency supply and first-aid kit.
  • Train in basic first aid.

Remember, you can’t plan when a disaster will occur, but you can plan ahead to be prepared if and when a disaster does strike. This September, take time to learn more about NPM and take the suggested steps to become properly prepared. For more information, please visit the NPM website.

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Prevent Heat Illness

August 10th, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

There were 7,415 heat-related deaths in the United States from 1999 to 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These preventable deaths illustrate how important preparation is during extreme temperatures. Whether you are swimming at the beach or lounging in the park, you should be prepared for extreme heat conditions.

Stay Prepared

The CDC provides three easy steps to prevent heat-related illnesses: stay cool, stay hydrated and stay informed. This summer, make sure you have shade wherever you are going and have attire, like a sun hat or a thin, long-sleeved shirt, to avoid direct contact with the sun. Be sure to drink lots of water—more than you usually do. Your body quickly loses fluids in the summer more quickly, which can lead to illness. Finally, stay informed by monitoring the local weather forecast and prepare accordingly for outdoor activities.

Know the Signs

The two most dangerous heat-related illnesses, besides dehydration, are heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat exhaustion is exhibited through cold, clammy skin, heavy sweating and nausea. If you or someone shows these symptoms, move to a cooler location and sip water. If you or someone has a rapid pulse, hot and red skin, and loses consciousness, this could mean heat stroke, and you should call 911 immediately. In this latter scenario, do not give fluids to the person showing the symptoms. Do, however, move them to a cooler location and lower their temperature with cool cloths.

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Do You Know Seizure First Aid?

July 6th, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 10 people may have a seizure in their lifetime. A seizure is a change in the brain’s electrical activity that can cause a variety of symptoms, including violent shaking, falling and losing bodily control. However, because there are different types of seizures, symptoms can vary.

Knowing proper seizure first aid is important so that you can help keep a person who is having a seizure safe and prevent further injury. General seizure first aid includes the following:

  • Clear the area immediately to prevent possible injury.
  • If the person is standing, gently guide them to the floor. Roll them on their side and cushion their head.
  • Time the seizure. If the person has epilepsy and the seizure lasts longer than three minutes, call 911.
  • Call 911 if any of the following apply:
    • The person is pregnant.
    • The person has never had a seizure before.
    • The person does not regain consciousness after the seizure.
    • The seizure lasts longer than five minutes.
  • Do not attempt to hold the person down or put anything in their mouth while they are seizing. Doing so could cause injury.

For other seizure first-aid tips, please visit the CDC’s webpage.

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Tick and Tick-borne Disease

June 1st, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Experts are warning that this year’s tick season could be worse and more widespread than ever due to milder winters, booming mice and deer populations, and the 2015 abundant acorn crop. Unfortunately, with the projected increase of ticks, the threat of tick-borne disease, including the most common, Lyme disease, also increases.

The best way to avoid contracting a tick-borne disease is to practice proper preventive measures, which include the following:

  • Wear light-colored clothing, including long-sleeved shirts and pants when in wooded areas, and tuck pant legs into socks or boots. Keep long hair tied back.
     
  • Wash your body and clothing after all outdoor activities.
     
  • Look periodically for ticks if you have been outdoors, especially if you have been in wooded areas or gardens.
     
  • Remove ticks within 24 hours to greatly reduce the risk of contracting disease.
     
  • Talk with your veterinarian about tick repellent for your pet.
     
  • Check your pet’s coat if it has been in a possible tick-infested area.

For more information on ticks and tick-borne disease, click here.

Spring Allergy Alleviation

May 8th, 2017 | No Comments | Posted in Live Well, Work Well

Springtime allergies are an annual nuisance for many people. Mold growth increases due to rain and many plants begin releasing pollen. Likewise, spring-cleaning activities can stir up dust mites. To reduce your allergies, be sure to take the following steps:

  • Wash your bedding every week in hot water to help keep pollen under control.
  • Wash your hair before going to bed, since pollen can accumulate in your hair.
  • Wear an inexpensive painter’s mask and gloves when cleaning, vacuuming or painting to limit dust and chemical inhalation and skin exposure.
  • Vacuum twice a week.
  • Limit the number of throw rugs in your home to reduce dust and mold.
  • Make sure the rugs you have are washable.
  • Change air conditioning and heating air filters often.
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